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H&M embraces diversity

By Michelle Verderber

The Swedish clothing store Hennes & Mauritz, better known as H&M, has a campaign called “Close the Loop” which promotes their new jeans and recycling clothes. H&M gives a £5 ($7.55) voucher to someone who donates a bag of used clothes. H&M will use the recycled clothing to make its new jeans rather than new materials. The 90 second advertisement to promote its campaign showcases a variety of people in a unique style.

H&M logo

The ad was created by the Forsman & Bodenfors agency, which makes artistic and different advertisements. The agency did an ad campaign in 2013 for Volvo’s Dynamic Steering for its trucks. They consisted of a series of ads which portrayed different stunts. One stunt showed Jean-Claude Van Damme, a Belgian actor, doing a split while each of his legs were of a different truck as they were moving.

The H&M commercial shows people of different ethnicities, ages, and sizes. Tess Holliday, the first size 22 model, and Mariah Idrissi, a hijab-wearing model, were feature models.

“I think it’s important to use women in hijab because Islam is the second largest religion in the world,” Idrissi expressed to Buzzfeed.

An amputee model and some transgendered models were also featured. H&M’s sister store, & Other Stories, used all transgender models in another advertisement campaign.

“The fashion world is embracing transgender models and we think that’s great,” said Sara Hilden, & Other Stories creative director, in a press release. “But we couldn’t help to ask ourselves how the traditional fashion gaze can change if we keep the same normative crew behind the camera. So we invited five amazing creatives, all transgender, to make our latest story.”

H&M is breaking out of the normal fashion world and embracing all types of people. Its “Close the Loop” campaign focuses on recycling clothing, and it included a variety of people. Currently 20 percent of the used clothing is used for new jeans, and H&M hopes to one day use 100 percent of used clothes to make its jeans.

Photo Courtesy of: commons.wikimedia.org

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