• 2018-2019,  Features

    German student adjusts to East

    East is infamous among its students for presenting a level of academic rigor unreasonable for everyone to succeed. But is it really so? According to Hannah Dannenberg, an exchange student from Berlin attending East for the year, Chapel Hill is really not all that bad. When comparing East and her school in Germany, Dannenberg said it was “easy” at East and that the homework load was a lot higher in Germany. Dannenberg’s school is also more arts focused, often going on art and fashion oriented field trips. Students are required to take both Latin and English starting in first grade, explaining the high difficulty environment. Attending such a rigorous school…

  • 2018-2019,  Features

    East student voters prepared for the NC election this month

    Without degrees, careers or even sometimes transportation, young people have been forced to get creative in order to be heard. Protests, marches and the advent of social media provide increased visibility and the ability to affect change for young people. The most conventional practice of democracy, however, is voting. The 2018 midterm elections could allow for the country’s leaders to realize the interests and opinions of its younger citizens, which can only be accessed if they decide to vote. According to Electproject.org, voters 18 to 24 have consistently lower turnout rates than their older counterparts. 18 to 24 year olds have turnout rates between twenty and forty percent, while thirty to…

  • 2018-2019,  Features

    Sensei Aoyagi: Japanese Teacher

    During the last school year, Yoshimi Aoyagi, the Japanese teacher at East and Chapel Hill High School, won three statewide and national awards. In 2017, she was one of three teachers nationally to win the Elgin Heinz award, an award designed to honor teachers who further understanding between Americans and Japanese. Sensei Aoyagi has been teaching Japanese in the district for 11 years. She is a nationally merited teacher and is known for her high expectations and creating an inclusive classroom environment. For some, these accomplishments, awards and praise might go straight to one’s head, but students say that’s not the case with Aoyagi. “She told us she wasn’t going…

  • 2018-2019,  Features

    Hollerin’: A N.C. tradition

    October, 18, 2016. Spivey’s Corner, North Carolina. A lone man stands at a microphone, wailing his lungs out. This is the last cry of a dying Carolina tradition: hollerin’. Fifty years ago, in rural N.C., before cell phones, before sirens, there was hollerin’. Farmers would call their children and their cows with melodic, whooping cries that resounded across pastures, around barns and through the woods. Each person’s holler was as individual as the people themselves, with calls that are impossible to capture in words. And these unique calls were showcased for 47 years at the National Hollerin’ Contest in Spivey’s Corner, the undisputed hollerin’ capital of the nation. As Ermon…

  • 2018-2019,  Features

    The Science Behind: The Dangers of space

    For thousands of years, people have been obsessed with exploration. They traveled across land and sea to find not only new resources but new places to settle. When land space ran out, people started to look at places outside of our planet that could possibly be suitable for humans to live. However, scientists have discovered that it is not easy, and they face many challenges such as space debris and radiation. Space debris surrounds Earth and includes man-made objects that float around in space, and there are thousands of pieces in Earth’s orbit. “Space is actually essentially empty,” said Gerald Cecil, a professor at the University of North Carolina at…