• Arts & Culture

    Reporting from Moscow: Yeltsin to Yanukovych

    When General Secretary Gorbachev  announced the policy of perestroika and the floodgates of glasnost opened in March 1985, the press, and the Western press in particular, suddenly became a functioning unit of Russian civil society. This is not to say that a reporter could not report prior to liberalization, but the deep and intimate research required to understand the anguished Russian situation had been largely impossible. David Remnick, now editor of The New Yorker, arrived in Moscow as a reporter for the The Post in the late 80’s. His time there would become the subject of his Pulitzer Prize winning book, “Lenin’s Tomb: The Last Days of The Soviet Empire.”…

  • Arts & Culture

    A walking tour of East Anglia, sans time and place

    The ethereal rings of Saturn are constructed of mere space rubble, removed from formerly glorious space bodies. This idea, of decomposition and of unimportance, is pursued serenely by the roving author, W.G. Sebald. His third book, “The Rings of Saturn,” is a walking tour of the Eastern shores of England, as well as a meditation on the nature of decay in society and the fluidity of time. Sebald’s simple and precise language translated from German, follows the narrator, who may or may not be Sebald, along the coast and through the different dimensions of British Imperial history. This short novel defies the laws of time and lacks any backbone of…

  • Archived,  Arts & Culture

    “The Devil in The White City” is a thrill of history

    Erik Larson’s renowned book, ‘The Devil in The White City’ has grown in popularity since its original release. The historical true crime tale employs a unique novel-style method of storytelling which invites the reader into a funny, suspenseful, and ultimately horrifying tale about the glory of the Chicago World’s Fair and the terror of H.H. Holmes’s murder hotel, in which hundreds of women allegedly went missing. ‘The Devil in The White City’ is one of Larson’s five historical novels, and is surely his most exciting. The book details the occurrences of the 1963 World’s Fair, known most prominently as The Columbian Exhibition. Closely following the Parisian Exposition Universelle in 1889,…

  • Archived,  News

    College Board implements new APUSH curriculum

    By Madison Lewis and Emma Brodey This year, the College Board has implemented a new AP U.S. History curriculum, a subject of controversy among many educators. The revised curriculum designates new systems for both testing and content, dividing American history into new key time periods. The new course also emphasizes historical analysis skills. These changes have already begun impacting East students taking APUSH. The new curriculum combines the major time periods and overarching themes that need to be discussed into nine main periods while adding more perspectives and angles to the course. The course was once divided into 28 key themes and now splits American history into only seven. This…

  • News

    In Our Backyard to be brought back, addresses local issues

    By Taylor Daly As the due date to turn in next year’s course selections quickly approaches, students should take note of an exciting new offering: In Our Backyard, a history elective that focuses on local politics and student government. In truth, this class is not entirely new to East’s curriculum. It was taught by history department mainstay Bob Brogden for over a decade, but ceased to exist when there was insufficient interest in the class. Next year, relative newcomer Dominic Koplar, who is also the SGA adviser, will be the instructor. A change in teaching is not the only difference in the course. While in the past it mainly focused…