• Arts & Culture

    Reporting from Moscow: Yeltsin to Yanukovych

    When General Secretary Gorbachev  announced the policy of perestroika and the floodgates of glasnost opened in March 1985, the press, and the Western press in particular, suddenly became a functioning unit of Russian civil society. This is not to say that a reporter could not report prior to liberalization, but the deep and intimate research required to understand the anguished Russian situation had been largely impossible. David Remnick, now editor of The New Yorker, arrived in Moscow as a reporter for the The Post in the late 80’s. His time there would become the subject of his Pulitzer Prize winning book, “Lenin’s Tomb: The Last Days of The Soviet Empire.”…

  • Opinions

    The United States Must Stay In Eastern Europe

    Since the crisis of Crimea and the ignition of the ongoing civil war in the Ukraine, the United States has failed to aid its allies in Kiev and stop Russia from sending arms and manpower to the Russian separatists in Donetsk and Luhansk. As a direct result of these failures, the separatists were emboldened to claim independence and even issue passports. Consequently, American influence in Eastern Europe has severely declined and former allies of the United States have begun to look elsewhere for protection. With the European Union on the rise and Russia looking to regain hegemony over the former territories of the USSR, the United States must reassert its…

  • Opinions

    America and Russia approach Cold War-Relations

    The fiery and divisive election of 2016 brought anxiety for some, and joy for others. However, there is a far more frightening issue that lies beneath the results of the election and its immediate impacts. It was confirmed by the Office of The Director of National Intelligence that the Russian government organized the hacking of the Democratic National Convention. An intelligence community assessment claimed that there was evidence to support Vladimir Putin’s direct involvement in a plot designed to undermine American trust in the democratic system. Russia has repeatedly denied involvement in this egregious, information-age attack on a sovereign nation. After Syria was confirmed to have used banned chemical weapons…

  • Archived,  News

    Why is Russia rushin’ into Syria?

    By: Julia Long The civil war raging in Syria for the past four years has not only shaken the region, but also the world. Talks regarding airstrikes and counter-terrorism efforts in Syria between the US and Russia are so tense because of individual interests taking priority over concern regarding terrorism or crimes against humanity. Over the past couple of months, talks between the U.S. and Russia have done little more than establish the conflicting positions of each country rather than build to a compromise. The largest underlying issue between the two nations at this point is that their loyalties in the Middle East lie in different places. Russia backs the…

  • News

    Russian-US tensions on the rise: Are we on the brink of the second Cold War?

    The violence in Ukraine took on much broader geopolitical significance on Feb. 27, when Russian President Vladimir Putin called for military action in the country and a force of heavily armed soldiers arrived in the Crimean peninsula. This is just the latest development in what has been a tension-filled several years between Russia and the West reminiscent of the Cold War. Since Putin’s 2012 election for a third term, relations between Russia and the U.S. have been strained at best. Russian violations of anti-missile treaties, culminating in a Jan. 29 cruise missile launch, raised concerns about Putin’s apparent disinterest in de-escalating the Cold War arms race. “If the Russian government…