• Opinions

    Loyalty over experience: Jacob Zuma and Donald Trump

    Every new president must face the task of choosing a new cabinet. As Donald Trump struggled to fill his appointments, I was reminded of another foreign leader; Jacob Zuma, the President of South Africa, whom I had the opportunity to observe when I spent five months in South Africa this fall. In South Africa, the president is elected by the Parliament, and in turn the political party  that controls the Parliament chooses the president. Since the first free election after Apartheid ended in 1994, the African National Congress or ANC has controlled both the Parliament and presidency. The current President of South Africa, Jacob Zuma, was first elected in 2009.…

  • News

    Russian-US tensions on the rise: Are we on the brink of the second Cold War?

    The violence in Ukraine took on much broader geopolitical significance on Feb. 27, when Russian President Vladimir Putin called for military action in the country and a force of heavily armed soldiers arrived in the Crimean peninsula. This is just the latest development in what has been a tension-filled several years between Russia and the West reminiscent of the Cold War. Since Putin’s 2012 election for a third term, relations between Russia and the U.S. have been strained at best. Russian violations of anti-missile treaties, culminating in a Jan. 29 cruise missile launch, raised concerns about Putin’s apparent disinterest in de-escalating the Cold War arms race. “If the Russian government…

  • News

    Common Core could solve US education crisis, PISA says

    By Sam Killenberg In yet another barometer of international student proficiency, the United States ranked below average in math, science and social studies. The Programme for International Student Assessment, or PISA, was released in early December and showed some troubling trends for American students. The test, which is administered every three years to over 500,000 15-year-olds in 65 nations, had several key findings: 1. The United States’ scores have stagnated. Across the three major subjects, U.S. scores have stayed roughly the same since the first PISA was administered in 2000. This has allowed other countries to overtake the U.S. each year. “While our scores in reading are the same as…

  • Archived

    3D printers to take over world

    By Emma Brodey These days, you can go online and buy yourself a 3D printer. It sounds like the premise of a science fiction novel, but it’s true. 3D printers are a new and thriving area of technology. They even function easily, printing out any item you can create on a computer program. The only limits are materials, quality of printer, and your imagination. What’s more, these 3D printers are fairly financially accessible, often sold for less than $2,000. This new area has almost unlimited potential to overturn industry as we know it. 3D printers can be used for a multitude of purposes. At the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative…

  • Archived,  Features

    Wildcats’ wanderlust leads to international experiences

    By Kayla Miron While most East students report regular feelings of exhaustion, sophomore Adriana Lorenzini and junior Amos Pomp must tackle culture and language gaps in addition to the usual struggles of high school. Instead of taking classes in Chapel Hill, Lorenzini and Pomp are currently studying abroad in Germany and Israel respectively. Lorenzini  left on her 10-month program to Vreden, Germany in early August, hopeful that the experience would help her become a better global citizen. She departed hoping to sharpen her unrefined desire to work in European politics. She also hopes that studying abroad will also allow her better cultural understanding and appreciation. “I’m here in Germany because…